Author: Milton Magazine

A Change ın Plans

It was a time when everything changed. As the first signs of spring were appearing on campus, members of the senior class had much to look forward to. Spring break was coming up, and after months of hard work, seniors were preparing to take off for class-and-sports-related programs or to relax with friends and family. — hen they returned from break, there would be spring sports—tennis, sailing, lacrosse, and baseball—and concerts, art shows, and a spring play. And, of course, there would be Prom and Graduation—those final moments to celebrate with friends and classmates everything they had shared. — ut all that changed...

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Rethinking Building Blocks, Growing in New Ways

“At Milton, we were used to building a community of young people and old people who love to learn,” said David Ball, Upper School principal, at a faculty meeting last spring. “We bring them all together and build a community to deepen our understanding of the world. I just assumed the building blocks—the classroom, the dorms, the performances—would always be there. The most challenging part was not having those building blocks. Our situation required careful thought; we had to rethink our building blocks and our circumstances. We were pushed to grow in new ways.” During the early weeks of March, the rapidly evolving...

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The Importance of Being Seen

-When Classes went remote in the spring, Middle and Lower School leaders found creative ways to connect with Milton’s youngest students.- The unscripted moments of a Middle School day—a passing conversation in the hallway, a pickup game at recess, an “aha!” moment in robotics—are what make the experience special, according to Steven Bertozzi, principal of Milton’s Middle School. Interviewed at the end of the spring semester,  leaders of the Middle and Lower Schools described their efforts to meet the nonacademic needs—social, emotional, and physical—of Milton students as the School began its remote-learning program in response to the novel coronavirus....

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A Different Kind of Classroom

– As Milton shifted to remote learning last spring, History Teacher Katharine Millet ’00 and her students discovered new ways of teaching, learning, and remaining close. – “How likely is it that we will come back after spring break, Ms. Millet?” A student looked up at me from her seat at the Harkness table—curious, but not worried. “I don’t know,” I said,“but I suspect we will probably come back on time.” That was Monday, March 9, 2020. By Wednesday, the prospects looked more dire, and by Thursday night, the administration had made the decision to start spring break a...

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Milton 2020:A Feet-First Leap Into the Unknown

By Todd B. Bland In an ordinary year, autumn days on cam- pus can make it feel like time has stopped: The comforting scent of sun-warmed bricks mingles with smoke from the Straus chimney, the afternoon spills golden light into Wigg Hall, and footsteps on dry, crunchy leaves provide a soundtrack. When you close your eyes, it could be 2020 or 1920. It may be tempting in those moments, in a place with such an enduring history as Mil- ton’s, for some people to romanticize the past— to yearn for days we perceive to have been less challenging, to...

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